or

“Gedney’s Appalachia work is refreshing to me because it feels so incredibly real. Sartor noted that, “We keep looking because it (Gedney’s work) feels so genuine.” I couldn’t agree more. His unassuming presence allowed him to capture moments so obviously absent from most of the work I’ve seen from Appalachia, that one has to wonder why so few photographs like this exist. Certainly at the time he was photographing in Appalachia, there was a stream of imagery coming out of there that I feel shaped the way we look at Appalachia today. For me, Gedney chose to see and show the deeper humanity of my home. How he saw the world, my world, challenges me to be truer, to be more authentic when I work.”

For those of you who took the time to visit Roger May’s first blog post Looking at Appalachia – William Gedney (Part one), and who were utterly entranced by his work, Part two is now posted, and also Part three, the final installment. Roger’s personal connection to Appalachia, and insight, adds immensely to the piece. Pop over and be seduced once again.

Appalachia © William Gedney Collection

John MacPherson was born and lives in the Scottish Highlands. He trained as a welder in the Glasgow shipyards, before completing an apprenticeship as a carpenter, and then qualified as a Social Worker in Disability Services. Along the way he has cooked on canal barges, trained as an Alpine Ski Leader & worked as an Instructor for Skiers with disabilities, been a canoe instructor, and tutor of night classes in carpentry, stained glass design and manufacture, and archery. He has travelled extensively on various continents, undertaking solo trips by bicycle, or motorcycle. He has had narrow escapes from an ambush by terrorists, been hit by lightning, caught in an erupting volcano, trapped in a mobile home by a tornado, kidnapped by a dog's hairdresser, rammed by a basking shark and was once bitten by a wild otter. He has combined all this with professional photography, which he has practised for over 35 years. He teaches photography and acts as a photography guide & tutor in the UK and abroad. His biggest challenge is keeping his 27 year old Land Rover 110 on the road. He loves telling and hearing stories.

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